Mysteries of Matter: Into Thin Air video worksheet

I like to use this video in chemistry classes either when learning about the periodic tableMysteries of Matter Cover, or later when beginning reactions.  It could really fit in anywhere, even as a good sub plan!

These questions follow the video Mysteries of Matter Episode 1: Into Thin Air.  For more information about the film visit the website: http://www.pbs.org/program/mystery-matter/ The video is 1 hour long and is available through the PBS store or your library.

Brief summary of the video:

This is the first of 3 episodes in the Mysteries of Matter series.  It introduces us to 3 scientists and how their work progresses in related topics.  We begin with James Priestley in England who experiments with ‘fixed air.’  Then, it moves on to Paris for the work of Antoine Lavoisier in discovering oxygen.  Finally, Humphrey Davy is described as a charismatic lecturer, enthusiastic ‘tester’ of different gasses, and discoverer of more elements.

In addition to discussing elements, the following topics become good discussions with this video:

  • Does a gas have mass?
  • Scientific collaboration – is it wise to share all of your experiments and results?  What if you don’t understand the results?  Who should get credit for a discovery – the person who performed the experiment, or the person who understands its significance?
  • Lab Safety – Compare the procedures and equipment that we would use today, with the methods used in this episode
  • Chemistry as a hobby – in a time without TV, internet, etc.  people went to lectures as entertainment, people tinkered in their own homes to make new discoveries.

I have created a video guide with questions for students to fill in as they watch this film.  If you are interested in the handout it is available through my Teachers Pay Teachers store by clicking here:  https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Mysteries-of-Matter-Into-Thin-Air-video-worksheet-2462293

What do you think of this video?  I thought it was very valuable and my students found it interesting!

Darwin’s Dangerous Idea: PBS Evolution Video

DarwinVideoCoverThese questions follow the NOVA video Darwin’s Dangerous Idea from the PBS Evolution series. There is a printable worksheet and answer key available in both .doc and .pdf formats. For more information about the film visit the website: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/evolution/darwin/
The video is 2 hours long and is available through the PBS store or your library

I like to use this video near the beginning of our study of Evolution. In addition to discussing Evolution, the following topics become good discussions with this video:
What scientists do – the fact that in science your success is measured by what you can publish in scientific journals, and funding for your work is provided based on both your past work and your ideas
How the field of science has changed since the 1850s
The influence of religion on society and on scientific debate in that time period

Brief summary of the video:
Darwin’s Dangerous Idea takes us back in time to Darwin’s voyage on the Beagle and his work and life upon his return from that journey. It shows us about his struggle to come to terms with his findings and his fear about how to present them. The video is long but in addition to documentary-style interviews and imagery there is a fictional depiction of Darwin’s life that brings the film together.

If you would like to use my video worksheet it is available at my TPT Store: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Darwins-Dangerous-Idea-PBS-Evolution-Video-Worksheet

 

DNA – The Secret of Photo 51

Photo 51The NOVA video The Secret of Photo 51 is a resource that I like to use near the beginning of our study of DNA when we are learning about the structure of DNA. It is a good introduction to the work that went on in discovering the structure of DNA and also gets into ‘What Scientists Do.’

Brief summary of the video:

The Secret of Photo 51 takes us into post-World War II Europe where the race to determine the structure of DNA was heating up. The video describes what Watson and Crick were doing, but focuses on their ‘unknowing collaborator’ Rosalind Franklin. She was using X-ray diffraction techniques to analyze the structure of DNA. It is said that without knowledge of her unpublished work Watson and Crick would not have been able to determine the structure of DNA.

In addition to discussing DNA structure, the following topics become good discussions with this video:

  • What scientists do – the fact that in science your success is measured by what you can publish in scientific journals, and funding for your work is provided based on both your past work and your ideas
  • How life has changed for women scientists – Rosalind Franklin was not treated well, or as an equal, by the men that she was working with at the time
  • Scientific press vs. popular press (in terms of Watson’s book)
  • The Nobel Prize – I like to describe it as winning the Superbowl of science!

The video is 1 hour long and is available through the PBS store or your library. For more information about the film visit the PBS website: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/photo51/

I have created a video guide with questions for students to fill in as they watch this film.  If you are interested in the handout it is available through my Teacher Pay Teachers store by clicking here:  http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/DNA-The-Secret-of-Photo-51-Video-Worksheet